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  • Writer's pictureBy The Financial District

4-Day Workweeks Explored By 33% Of U.S. Firms

Burnout is such a problem for workers that some bosses are considering shrinking the length of the workweek.


Some executives are searching for ways to attract and retain talent in a red-hot job market where many employees feel overworked and underpaid.



Nearly one-third (30%) of large US companies are exploring new work schedule shifts such as four-day or four-and-a-half-day workweeks, according to a KPMG survey of CEOs released this week, Matt Egan reported for CNN.


The findings show how some executives are searching for ways to attract and retain talent in a red-hot job market where many employees feel overworked and underpaid.



“We are all working to figure out what is optimal, and we will continue to experiment and pivot,” Paul Knopp, chair and CEO of KPMG US, told CNN in an interview. Many workers say they would love a shorter workweek.


A full 77% of US workers said a four-day, 40-hour workweek would have a positive impact on their well-being, according to a Gallup poll released in November.



That includes 46% who said it would have an “extremely positive” effect.


The good news for workers is that some studies of four-day workweeks in the US and Europe have found positive results for well-being and productivity among workers.




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