• By The Financial District

TRUMP HOTEL EMPLOYEES FAKED SUPPORT FOR DONALD: MAGAZINE

For employees at the Trump International Hotel who weren't Donald Trump supporters, pretending to be one was an unwritten rule of the job, according to a Washingtonian report, Oma Seddiq reported for Business Insider.

Happyornot makes feedback terminals measuring customer satisfaction sing smiley-face buttons.

One ex-manager at the luxury hotel in Washington, DC, told the local magazine that she quickly learned on her first days at work she'd have to fake being a fan of the former president. When given a tour of the place by another employee, they had commented that Trump was "such a kind soul" and "so good to the people."


The former manager felt inclined to agree, but later admitted: "Inside, I was dying." Another former employee, Michel Rivera, who was a bartender at the lobby bar, told the Washingtonian that he had to lie in order to portray himself as part of the Trump crowd.


All the news: Business man in suit and tie smiling and reading a newspaper near the financial district.

"I said certain things to play the part and do what I needed to do in order to avoid problems," Rivera told the magazine.


"A lot of times, I would end up being like, 'Yes, I support the president. He's an amazing guy.'" The Washingtonian's Jessica Sidman spoke to several past employees of the Trump hotel who detailed the pros and cons of working at a place owned by the former president while he was in office.


Besides the feigned enthusiasm over Trump, another regular work occurrence was harassment from people who opposed Trump. Sometimes, food suppliers to the hotel's restaurant BLT Prime would send spoiled produce and poor cuts of fish and meat, former executive chef Bill Williamson said.


Business: Business men in suite and tie in a work meeting in the office located in the financial district.

During breaks on the hotel balcony, one manager who was actually pro-Trump, said he'd get the finger from a passerby.


While in uniform on his Metro commute, he'd get berated by other traingoers.


Ultimately, he got tired of the public shaming and left the job, he told the Washingtonian. Employees were also expected to abide by strict dress codes, with policies limiting the length of a man's beard and the length of a woman's fingernails.


"I always tried to dress like a Fox News anchor," one former female manager said.



WEEKLY FEATURE : BONNER DYTOC SHOWS THE WAY IN STOCK PLAY


Happyornot makes feedback terminals measuring customer satisfaction sing smiley-face buttons.
Happyornot makes feedback terminals measuring customer satisfaction sing smiley-face buttons.