• By The Financial District

70% Of Americans Back U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan, Poll Shows

A recent survey by a US think tank showed that 70 percent of Americans supported the withdrawal of US forces from Afghanistan, where the Taliban Islamist group has regained power after almost 20 years of conflict following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the US.

Photo Insert: U.S. soldiers boarding a military helicopter in Afghansitan

The survey by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs conducted in July underscores strong public backing, which is behind President Joe Biden's decision to pull out all US troops from Afghanistan despite objections by some critics, Kyodo News reported.


The survey showed that such support spans partisan affiliations, with 77 percent of Democrats and 73 percent of independents agreeing, compared with Republicans at 56 percent. The survey found that 29 percent opposed the decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan.


The Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on U.S. soil orchestrated by the Islamic extremist group Al-Qaeda led the United States to launch a war against the group and the Taliban which harbored it.

After chaos at the international airport in the Afghan capital Kabul swarming with people desperate to flee the Taliban-held nation was broadcast to the world, questions, and criticism of the handling of the US withdrawal mounted.


All the news: Business man in suit and tie smiling and reading a newspaper near the financial district.

Biden said in a speech from the White House that the "only vital national interest in Afghanistan" remains preventing a terrorist attack on the American homeland. His remarks came after Taliban forces entered Kabul on Aug. 15, leading to the collapse of the Afghan government.


Government & politics: Politicians, government officials and delegates standing in front of their country flags in a political event in the financial district.

In another survey by the Associated Press and NORC at the University of Chicago conducted this month, most Americans, 62 percent, said the war in Afghanistan was "not worth fighting," as the US public is more concerned about the threat caused by domestic extremist groups. The figure is higher among Democrats at 67 percent compared with that of Republicans at 57 percent.



WEEKLY FEATURE : PAL READY TO SOAR WITH PANDEMIC

Optimize asset flow management and real-time inventory visibility with RFID tracking devices and custom cloud solutions.
Sweetmat disinfection mat