• By The Financial District

Australia Seeks Tougher Cybersecurity Laws After Optus Data Breach

The Australian government said it was considering tougher cybersecurity rules for telecommunications companies after Optus, the nation’s second-largest wireless carrier, reported personal data of 9.8 million customers had been breached, Rod McGuirk reported for the Associated Press (AP).


Photo Insert: Optus said the information that had been accessed by an unnamed third party included customers’ names, dates of birth, phone numbers, and email addresses.



Optus said Thursday it had become aware the day before of the cyberattack breaching details of 9.8 million people — within Australia’s population of 26 million. In the cases of 2.8 million current and former Optus customers, the breach involved “significant amounts of personal data,” Cybersecurity Minister Clare O’Neil told Parliament.


“The breach is of a nature that we should not expect to see in a large telecommunications provider in this country,” O’Neil said.



In some countries, such a breach would result in fines “amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars,” O’Neil said. Australian law doesn’t currently allow for Optus to be fined for the breach.


“A very substantial reform task is going to emerge from a breach of this scale and size,” O’Neil said. “One significant question is whether the cybersecurity requirements that we place on large telecommunications providers in this country are fit for purpose,” she added.


All the news: Business man in suit and tie smiling and reading a newspaper near the financial district.

O’Neil called on Optus to offer compromised customers free credit monitoring to protect them from identity theft, a request that the Sydney-based company complied with later on Monday.


Optus announced it was offering its “most affected” customers 12-month free subscriptions to Equifax Protect, a credit monitoring and identity protection service.


Business: Business men in suite and tie in a work meeting in the office located in the financial district.

Optus said the information that had been accessed by an unnamed third party included customers’ names, dates of birth, phone numbers, and email addresses. For a minority, the personal data also included identification documents such as driver’s license and passport numbers.



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