• By The Financial District

Bayer To Stop U.S. Home Sales of Glyphosate-Based Herbicides

In a move that environmental groups celebrated as a "historic victory" following years of campaigning to remove Roundup and similar weed killers from store shelves, Bayer has announced that it will halt the sale of glyphosate-based herbicides to consumers in the US lawn and garden market by 2023, Kenny Stancil reported for Common Dreams and RawStory.

Photo Insert: Bayer will be rounding up production of home sales glyphosate herbicides for good

"Bayer's decision to end US residential sale[s] of Roundup is a historic victory for public health and the environment," Andrew Kimbrell, executive director of the Center for Food Safety (CFS), said in a statement.


"As agricultural, large-scale use of this toxic pesticide continues," he added, "our farm workers remain at risk. It's time for EPA to act and ban glyphosate for all uses." Given that Bayer's decision to stop selling glyphosate-based herbicides by 2023 only applies to consumers in the US lawn and garden market, Klein emphasized that the battle against this toxic chemical is far from over.


"Massive amounts of glyphosate will continue to be sprayed in parks, schools, and on food crops," she added. "Retailers and regulators must act now to ban this cancer-linked weed killer."


While calling the announcement "an important victory to protect the health of Americans," Kendra Klein, senior scientist at Friends of the Earth, stressed that "action on this toxic weed killer can't wait until 2023.


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Major home and garden retailers like Home Depot and Lowe's must lead the industry by ending the sales of Roundup immediately." The key ingredient found in Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide, is glyphosate.


Described by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "probably carcinogenic," glyphosate poses threats to human health and to pollinators such as bumblebees and monarch butterflies.


Business: Business men in suite and tie in a work meeting in the office located in the financial district.

Bayer stated that it will switch Roundup and other glyphosate-based weed killers to formulas that "rely on alternative active ingredients" in order to "manage litigation risk and not because of any safety concerns."


Thursday's decision came in response to several legal battles that Bayer, a German pharmaceutical and biotech corporation, inherited when it acquired Monsanto, a US agrochemical giant and creator of Roundup, in 2018.


Last year, Bayer announced multiple massive settlements totaling more than $11 billion to compensate individuals harmed by two Monsanto herbicides. In one case, the company agreed to pay $10.9 billion to about 125,000 people who alleged the use of Roundup was to blame for their cancer diagnoses.



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