• By The Financial District

COFFEE, TEA DEVELOPED IN SINGAPORE GOOD FOR DIGESTIVE HEALTH

Coffee lovers may soon be in for a brand-new wellness perk. Food scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a probiotic-rich coffee and tea, which are designed to boost digestive health, Amy Capetta reported for Yahoo News.

The two doctoral students claim that not only do these good-for-your-gut drinks contain as many as 1 billion units of live probiotics, but they can be stored at room temperature for more than 14 weeks without losing their effectiveness.


Consumers can easily find fermented live and active cultures present in a number of dairy products like raw milk, yogurt, kefir and aged cheeses, such as gouda, cheddar, and Swiss, but the new coffee and tea are rich in beneficial bacteria that benefit those diagnosed with certain health conditions, such as lactose intolerance, dairy allergy or high cholesterol.


The coffee and tea undergo different fermentation processes.


The creator of the gut-healthy chilled coffee added selected nutrients and probiotics to brewed coffee and allowed the beverage to ferment for 24 hours before placing it in the fridge.


Even better, the caffeine content remained intact, along with the chlorogenic acid content—organic compounds that have been shown to have anti-diabetic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity effects, according to a study published in the European Journal of Nutrition.


"Some of the probiotic coffees give better-balanced acidity, some give better mouthfeels, some have deeper smoky flavors, and some can retain the coffee flavor better after long-term storage," its creator Alcine Chan said.


The gut-friendly tea was also made with chosen nutrients and probiotics, yet this drink ferments for two days. It maintains its natural fruity or floral notes, as well as its polyphenols (micronutrients found in tea that may ward off cancer, neurological diseases, and cardiovascular diseases). The fermentation process for the tea produces the antibacterial agent phenyllactate.



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