• By The Financial District

Russia Leads Bid For Nuke Power Plants In Saudi Arabia That Trump, Fynn Backed

Since the FBI raided former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago in August, Americans were reminded that Trump’s former national security adviser, retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, and close friend and inaugural committee chairman Tom Barrack negotiated with Saudi Arabia to sell the kingdom the technology to build at least 14 nuclear reactors.


Photo Insert: While Trump was still on the presidential campaign trail in 2016, General Michael Flynn was negotiating a deal for the Saudis to get at least 14 – and as many as 40 – nuclear reactors from companies in America and Russia.



The House Oversight Committee obtained more than 60,000 pages of texts, emails, corporate memos, and reports that offered a vivid look at how dangerous the Middle East could have become if the secret negotiations resulted in a sale.


Flynn wasn’t just negotiating on behalf of US companies wanting to sell technology to the Saudis. He was also negotiating on behalf of Russia, Lynda Edwards reported for Raw Story.



While Trump was still on the presidential campaign trail in 2016, Flynn was negotiating a deal for the Saudis to get at least 14 – and as many as 40 – nuclear reactors from companies in America and Russia.


As a Congressional investigation would discover, Flynn had close ties to IP3, a nuclear energy firm run by former US generals, that would supply much of the materials, expertise, and design.


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Like Trump, Flynn wanted to lift US sanctions. Part of the deal he was pitching to the Saudis was that Russian construction and nuclear engineering firm OAO OMZ could sell its products and expertise to the kingdom.


This summer, it looks as if Saudi Arabia is getting the technology it initially had wanted from Flynn and the Trump Administration– and Russia is in a position to deliver it to the kingdom.


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And one thing hasn’t changed since 2016 when Flynn first hatched his plan to get the Saudis nuclear technology: The Saudis still don’t want to agree to nonproliferation or inspections of any nuclear technology they buy.


This summer as Trump appears to have been refusing to return classified documents to the US government, Saudi Arabia made an announcement the Western press didn't notice. It announced it was taking bids from China, Russia, France, and South Korea to build several nuclear reactors across the kingdom. And Saudi Arabia still didn’t want to agree to inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency.


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“That should set off alarm bells,” the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists (BAS) warned in July.


“Late in 2020, word leaked that the Saudis have been working secretly with the Chinese to mine and process Saudi uranium ore. These are steps toward enriching uranium—and a possible nuclear weapon program.”



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