• By The Financial District

6,500 WORKERS MAY HAVE DIED BUILDING QATAR’S 2022 WORLD CUP VENUES

At least 6,500 migrant workers from India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka have died during the 10-year construction of Qatar’s 2022 World Cup facilities due to shoddy work conditions and lack of training, according to The Guardian.

The shocking figure is likely grossly underestimated because no figures are available for migrant deaths from the workers from Kenya or the Philippines, Barbie Latza Nadreau also reported for the Daily Beast in the US on February 24, 2021.


The Guardian estimates that in the last 10 years since Qatar won the bid to host the event, an average of 12 migrant workers from the south Asian nations have died each week. That figure could be twice as high if records on other migrant deaths are released.


The World Cup will be held from Nov. 21 and Dec. 18, 2022, with 32 teams competing at eight stadiums.


Qatar’s human-rights record has been the subject of scrutiny since the nation won the bid to host the international event.


Amnesty International published a damning report accusing the wealthy country of lying to migrants to entice them to come and work.


Many workers paid hefty fees to recruitment firms hired by the Qatari government to cover transportation and accommodation. Many of them could not afford the fees, so they were given loans they have to pay back.


Once in Qatar, they are allegedly forced to live in squalid conditions and are often not paid in a timely manner or what they were promised. “Workers often live in cramped, dirty, and unsafe accommodation,” Amnesty International reported.


"Recruitment agents also make false promises about the salary workers will receive, and the type of job on offer. One worker was promised a salary of $300 a month in Nepal, but this turned out to be $190 once he started work in Qatar.”


Amnesty International also reports that all of the migrant workers they interviewed were stripped of their identity documents upon arrival and are not given renewed residence permits, meaning they cannot leave the country. The workers are also prohibited from changing jobs, making them stick with contracts that were signed without legal advice.


The average monthly salary of those working to convert the Khalifa Stadium for the games is $220, according to Amnesty International while the main subcontractor is being paid upwards of $35 million.



WEEKLY FEATURE : BONNER DYTOC SHOWS THE WAY IN STOCK PLAY



Register for News Alerts

  • LinkedIn
  • Instagram
  • YouTube

WHERE BUSINESS CLICKS

The Financial District®  2020