• By The Financial District

6 DR. SEUSS BOOKS CANNED DUE TO RACIST IMAGES

Six Dr. Seuss books — including “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo” — will stop being published because of racist and insensitive imagery, the business that preserves and protects the author’s legacy said.

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“These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,” Dr. Seuss Enterprises told The Associated Press (AP) in a statement that coincided with the late author and illustrator’s birthday.


Books by Dr. Seuss, born Theodor Seuss Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904, have been translated into dozens of languages as well as in braille and are sold in more than 100 countries. He died in 1991.


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“Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment and our broader plan to ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprises’ catalog represents and supports all communities and families,” it said.


The other books affected are “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!,” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”


The decision to cease publication and sales of the books was made last year after months of discussion, the company, which was founded by Seuss’ family, told AP.


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“Dr. Seuss Enterprises listened and took feedback from our audiences including teachers, academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process. We then worked with a panel of experts, including educators, to review our catalog of titles,” it said.


In “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” an Asian person is portrayed wearing a conical hat, holding chopsticks, and eating from a bowl.


“If I Ran the Zoo” includes a drawing of two bare-footed African men wearing what appear to be grass skirts with their hair tied above their heads.



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Happyornot makes feedback terminals measuring customer satisfaction sing smiley-face buttons.
Happyornot makes feedback terminals measuring customer satisfaction sing smiley-face buttons.