• By The Financial District

China Back To Using Coal To Produce Energy, Hike Industrial Output

China is promoting coal-fired power as the ruling Communist Party tries to revive a sluggish economy, prompting warnings Beijing is setting back efforts to cut climate-changing carbon emissions from the biggest global source, Joe McDonald reported for the Associated Press (AP).


Photo Insert: China accounts for 26.1% of global emissions, more than double the U.S. share of 12.8%.



Official plans call for boosting coal production capacity by 300 million tons this year, according to news reports. That is equal to 7% of last year’s output of 4.1 billion tons, which was an increase of 5.7% over 2020.


China is one of the biggest investors in wind and solar, but jittery leaders called for more coal-fired power after economic growth plunged last year and shortages caused blackouts and factory shutdowns. Russia’s attack on Ukraine added to anxiety that foreign oil and coal supplies might be disrupted.



“This mentality of ensuring energy security has become dominant, trumping carbon neutrality,” said Li Shuo, a senior global policy adviser for Greenpeace. “We are moving into a relatively unfavorable time period for climate action in China.”


China accounts for 26.1% of global emissions, more than double the U.S. share of 12.8%, according to the World Resources Institute (WRI.) Rhodium Group, a research firm, says China emits more than all developed economies combined.


All the news: Business man in suit and tie smiling and reading a newspaper near the financial district.

Per person, China’s 1.4 billion people on average emit the equivalent of 8.4 tons of carbon dioxide annually, according to WRI. That is less than half the U.S. average of 17.7 tons but more than the European Union’s 7.5 tons.


China has abundant supplies of coal and produced more than 90% of the 4.4 billion tons it burned last year. More than half of its oil and gas is imported and leaders see that as a strategic risk.


Market & economy: Market economist in suit and tie reading reports and analysing charts in the office located in the financial district.

China’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2060 appears to be on track, but using more coal “could jeopardize this, or at least slow it down and make it more costly,” Clare Perry of the Environmental Investigations Agency said in an email. Promoting coal will make emissions “much higher than they need to be” by the 2030 peak year, said Perry.


“This move runs entirely counter to the science,” she said.



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