• By The Financial District

U.S. CORPORATE LEADERS SHUN GOP, PUSH VOTING RIGHTS

Most CEOs on a call to discuss a new push against US state voting restrictions said in a poll they will reassess donating to candidates who fail to support voting rights, while many will consider holding back investments in states that restrict voting access, according to people familiar with the matter, Jessica DiNapoli reported for Reuters.

Some business executives are putting together a new statement calling for the protection of US voting rights, the latest corporate backlash against moves by Republican politicians to change election rules in Georgia and other states, the sources said.


About 100 chief executive officers, investors, lawyers and corporate directors participated in a private Zoom call on Saturday organized by Yale professor Jeffrey Sonnenfeld to discuss a new response to Georgia’s election law and voting restrictions contemplated by other states such as Texas and Arizona, according to the sources.


All the news: Business man in suit and tie smiling and reading a newspaper near the financial district.

All CEOs who participated in a poll during the call agreed they will re-evaluate political donations to candidates based on their track records on voting rights, while 48% said they might reconsider or reduce investments in states that restrict access to voting.


Some one-quarter of CEOs refrained from voting on several questions in the poll. Georgia’s decision last month to strengthen identification requirements for absentee ballots and make it a misdemeanor to offer food and water to voters waiting in line, among other changes, prompted many US companies, including Delta Air Lines Inc and Coca-Cola Co, to issue statements criticizing the law.


Major League Baseball pulled this year’s All-Star Game from Atlanta to protest the restrictions.



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